Rhythm deficits in ‘tone deafness’

@article{Foxton2006RhythmDI,
  title={Rhythm deficits in ‘tone deafness’},
  author={Jessica M. Foxton and Rachel K. Nandy and Timothy D. Griffiths},
  journal={Brain and Cognition},
  year={2006},
  volume={62},
  pages={24-29}
}
It is commonly observed that 'tone deaf' individuals are unable to hear the beat of a tune, yet deficits on simple timing tests have not been found. In this study, we investigated rhythm processing in nine individuals with congenital amusia ('tone deafness') and nine controls. Participants were presented with pairs of 5-note sequences, and were required to detect the presence of a lengthened interval. In different conditions the sound sequences were presented isochronously or in an integer… Expand
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  • Brain : a journal of neurology
  • 2010
TLDR
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