Rhesus monkey behaviour under diverse population densities: coping with long-term crowding

@article{Judge1997RhesusMB,
  title={Rhesus monkey behaviour under diverse population densities: coping with long-term crowding},
  author={Peter G. Judge and FRANS B. M. Waal},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1997},
  volume={54},
  pages={643-662}
}
  • P. Judge, F. Waal
  • Published 1 September 1997
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Animal Behaviour
A popular view is that high population density promotes behavioural pathology, particularly increased aggression. In contrast, according to a coping model, some primates have behavioural mechanisms (e.g. formal displays, reconciliation and grooming) that regulate social tensions and control the negative consequences of crowding. Seven captive rhesus monkey groups, Macaca mulattawere observed over a wide range of population densities where high-density groups were over 2000 times more crowded… Expand
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