Rhazes (865–925 AD)

@article{Zarshenas2011RhazesA,
  title={Rhazes (865–925 AD)},
  author={Mohamad M. Zarshenas and Alireza Mehdizadeh and Arman Zargaran and Abdolali Mohagheghzadeh},
  journal={Journal of Neurology},
  year={2011},
  volume={259},
  pages={1001-1002}
}
Abubakr Muhammad ibn Zakariyya al-Razi (865–925) is known to the western world as Rhazes. He is surely one of the most prominent medical scientists of the Islamic golden age [1]. He was born in Ray, a city south of Tehran [9]. Music and art were reportedly his earliest interests; he wrote an encyclopedia of music before the age of 30 [4]. Later, he was encouraged to study philosophy, mathematics, astronomy, chemistry, and medicine [7]. After finishing his medical studies in Baghdad he left to… 
Jorjani (1042–1137)
TLDR
Jorjani is documented as the author of the first large medical encyclopedia in the Persian language during the Islamic era, and this work, Zakhireye Kharazmshahi (Treasure of the Khwarazm Shah) is now regarded as the largest Persian medical encyclopedia.
Avicenna and Rhazes, two Persian scientists
TLDR
It is very clear that both Avicenna and Rhazes were Persian, but some evidences are presented here to clarify this issue.
First Report of a Disease by Rhazes 10 Centuries Ago
TLDR
As three compatible diseases with the case; have been described more than a thousand years after Rhazes (Weil's syndrome 1886, TTP 1925 and meningococcemia 1805); if the case is either Weil's or TTP orMeningococcal sepsis, it is the first report of the disease in the world by Rhazes.
Rhazes’ Contributions to Alchemy and Pharmacy
TLDR
These valuable manuscripts demonstrate the ancient heritage of Persians and the great roles and contributions of Persian scientists in the history of science.
Akhawayni (?–983 AD): A Persian neuropsychiatrist in the early medieval era (9th–12th Century AD)
TLDR
He was the first to describe sleep paralysis and to suggest pragmatic rather than supernatural treatment, and his descriptions of meningitis, mania, psychosis, dementia, dementia (Ghotrab), etc., are close to current concepts.
A Short Introduction to a 19th Century Persian Book on Pulsology: Naiier Azam
TLDR
Naiier Azam, one of the important works on cardiology in Persian medicine, which includes three parts: one introduction and two teaching chapters (Taelim).
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 11 REFERENCES
Abubakr Muhammad Ibn Zakaria Razi, Rhazes (865–925 ad)
TLDR
A pioneer of applied neuroanatomy, Rhazes used the differential diagnosis approach for the evaluation of his patients, an approach that continues to be used in modern medicine.
Abu Bakr Muhammad Ibn Zakariya Al Razi (Rhazes): Philosopher, Physician and Alchemist
TLDR
Al Razi quickly surpassed his teacher, and became a famous physician, and was appointed as director of the hospital of his hometown Al Rayy during the reign of Mansur Ibn Ishaq Ibn Ahmad Ibn Asad of the Samanian dynasty.
A tribute to Zakariya Razi (865 - 925 AD), an Iranian pioneer scholar.
TLDR
Zakariya Razi was not only one of the most important Persian physician-philosophers of his era, but for centuries his writings became fundamental teaching texts in European medical schools.
Insights into neurologic localization by Rhazes, a medieval Islamic physician
TLDR
Rhazes showed an outstanding clinical ability to localize lesions, prognosticate, and describe therapeutic options and reported clinical observations, emphasizing the link between the anatomic location of a lesion and the clinical signs.
Al-Razi and Islamic medicine in the 9th century.
TLDR
Mohammad Al-Razi was instrumental in convincing medical historians to conclude that gonorrhoea originated in the Middle Ages—a landmark in the history of venereology.
Hydrocephalus and its treatment according to Rhazes.
TLDR
The renowned medieval Persian physician Rhazes was an early proponent of experimental medicine and a pioneer in the field of neurosurgery and, as he was predominantly a pediatrician, he dealt with the subject of hydrocephalus.
Facial palsy and its management in the Kitab al-Hawi of Rhazes.
TLDR
The life of Rhazes is discussed and perhaps the first English translation of his writings dealing with facial palsy (Lagveh) and its treatment is provided.
Razi's description and treatment of facial paralysis.
TLDR
In the modern medical era, facial paralysis is linked with the name of Charles Bell; but historically other physicians had described it several hundred years prior although it had been ignored for different reasons, such as the difficulty of the original text language.
Rhazes (865–925 AD)
  • Childs Nerv Syst 23:1225–1226
  • 2012
al-Razi (Rhazes), 865–925
...
...