Revisiting the Cryptographic Hardness of Finding a Nash Equilibrium

@inproceedings{Garg2016RevisitingTC,
  title={Revisiting the Cryptographic Hardness of Finding a Nash Equilibrium},
  author={Sanjam Garg and Omkant Pandey and Akshayaram Srinivasan},
  booktitle={CRYPTO},
  year={2016}
}
The exact hardness of computing a Nash equilibrium is a fundamental open question in algorithmic game theory. This problem is complete for the complexity class PPAD. It is well known that problems in PPAD cannot be $$\mathrm {NP}$$ -complete unless $$\mathrm {NP}=\mathrm {coNP}$$ . Therefore, a natural direction is to reduce the hardness of PPAD to the hardness of problems used in cryptography. Bitansky, Paneth, and Rosen [FOCS 2015] prove the hardness of PPAD assuming the existence of quasi… 
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