Revisiting Paleoindian exploitation of extinct North American mammals

@article{Grayson2015RevisitingPE,
  title={Revisiting Paleoindian exploitation of extinct North American mammals},
  author={Donald K. Grayson and David J. Meltzer},
  journal={Journal of Archaeological Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={56},
  pages={177-193}
}
In 2002, we assessed all sites known to us that had been suggested to provide evidence for the association of Clovis-era archaeological material with the remains of extinct Pleistocene mammals in North America. We concluded that, of the 76 sites we assessed, 14 provided compelling evidence for human involvement in the death and/or dismemberment of such mammals. Of these sites, 12 involved mammoth (Mammuthus), the remaining two mastodon (Mammut). Here, we update that assessment. We examine… Expand

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