Corpus ID: 83440474

Revision of Alyxia (Apocynaceae). Part 2: Pacific Islands and Australia

@article{Middleton2002RevisionOA,
  title={Revision of Alyxia (Apocynaceae). Part 2: Pacific Islands and Australia},
  author={D. Middleton},
  journal={Blumea},
  year={2002},
  volume={47},
  pages={1-93}
}
The genus Alyxia is revised for Australia and the islands of the Pacific Ocean as the second and final part of a complete revision of the genus. 39 species are recognised for this area of which three are new to science, two are new combinations and one is a new name. 14 species are found in Australia and its offshore territories, 21 species in New Caledonia and the Loyalty Islands, and seven species in the other islands of the Pacific. There is relatively little overlap between regions: two… Expand

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