Review of high‐dose intravenous vitamin C as an anticancer agent

@article{Wilson2014ReviewOH,
  title={Review of high‐dose intravenous vitamin C as an anticancer agent},
  author={M. Wilson and B. Baguley and C. Wall and M. Jameson and M. Findlay},
  journal={Asia‐Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology},
  year={2014},
  volume={10}
}
In the 1970s, Pauling and Cameron reported increased survival of patients with advanced cancer treated with high‐dose intravenous (IV) vitamin C (L‐ascorbate, ascorbic acid). These studies were criticized for their retrospective nature and lack of standardization of key prognostic factors including performance status. Subsequently, several well‐designed randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate a significant survival benefit, although these trials used high‐dose oral vitamin C. Marked… Expand
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TLDR
It is indicated that the role of high-dose intravenous vitamin C therapy in cancer treatment should be reassessed in light of recent clinical pharmacokinetic findings and in vitro evidence of anti-tumour mechanisms. Expand
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TLDR
It is reported here that intravenous doses can produce plasma concentrations 30- to 70-fold higher than the maximum tolerated oral doses, and the role of vitamin C in cancer treatment should be reexamined, and insights from vitamin C pharmacokinetics can guide its clinical use. Expand
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TLDR
High-dose i.v. ascorbic acid was well tolerated but failed to demonstrate anticancer activity when administered to patients with previously treated advanced malignancies, suggesting the promise of this approach may lie in combination with cytotoxic or other redox-active molecules. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
In vivo results show that both intravenous and intraperitoneal administration of ascorbate induced pharmacologic concentrations in blood that exhibit interesting anticancer properties, and confirm that oral and parenteral Administration of asCorbate are not comparable. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
The two groups showed no appreciable difference in changes in symptoms, performance status, appetite or weight, and were unable to show a therapeutic benefit of high-dose vitamin C treatment. Expand
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TLDR
It is shown that ascorbate at pharmacologic concentrations was a prooxidant, generating hydrogen-peroxide-dependent cytotoxicity toward a variety of cancer cells in vitro without adversely affecting normal cells, and this action may have benefits in cancers with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Expand
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TLDR
The range of vitamin C concentrations possible in humans, pharmacokinetics studies were conducted and showed that when vitamin C is ingested by mouth, plasma and tissue concentrations are tightly controlled by at least 3 mechanisms in healthy humans: absorption, tissue accumulation, and renal re absorption. Expand
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