Review article: safe amounts of gluten for patients with wheat allergy or coeliac disease

@article{Hischenhuber2006ReviewAS,
  title={Review article: safe amounts of gluten for patients with wheat allergy or coeliac disease},
  author={C. Hischenhuber and R. Crevel and B. Jarry and M. M{\"a}ki and D. Moneret-vautrin and A. Romano and R. Troncone and R. Ward},
  journal={Alimentary Pharmacology \& Therapeutics},
  year={2006},
  volume={23}
}
For both wheat allergy and coeliac disease the dietary avoidance of wheat and other gluten‐containing cereals is the only effective treatment. Estimation of the maximum tolerated amount of gluten for susceptible individuals would support effective management of their disease. 
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • 2008
Wheat is one of the major crops grown, processed and consumed by humankind and is associated with both intolerances (notably coeliac disease) and allergies.
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A Case of Gluten Allergy in a 4-Year-Old Boy With Recurrent Urticaria
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A case of a 4-year-old boy with gluten allergy who presented with urticaria after ingestion kneaded wheat flour is reported with a brief review of the literature. Expand
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TLDR
A person diagnosed with celiac disease is likely to have aversions to wheat gluten and related proteins in rye and barley, as well as to have an immune response to these proteins. Expand
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Any novel medication for celiac disease should be as effective and safe as the gluten-free diet, and this constitutes a challenge for drug development. Expand
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