Review article: Inotrope and vasopressor use in the emergency department

@article{Senz2009ReviewAI,
  title={Review article: Inotrope and vasopressor use in the emergency department},
  author={Ainslie Senz and Leo Nunnink},
  journal={Emergency Medicine Australasia},
  year={2009},
  volume={21}
}
Shock is a common presentation to the ED, with the incidence of septic shock increasing in Australasia over the last decade. The choice of inotropic agent is likely dependent on previous experience and local practices of the emergency and other critical care departments. The relatively short duration of stay in the ED before transfer leaves little room for evaluating the appropriateness of and response to the agent chosen. Delays in transfer to inpatient facilities means that patients receive… Expand
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