Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome

@article{Ducros2012ReversibleCV,
  title={Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome},
  author={Anne Ducros},
  journal={The Lancet Neurology},
  year={2012},
  volume={11},
  pages={906-917}
}
  • A. Ducros
  • Published 1 October 2012
  • Medicine
  • The Lancet Neurology
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome following indomethacin
TLDR
Indomethacin, either alone or in combination with emotional stress from pain, triggered or exacerbated an underlying predisposition to Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS).
Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: Recognition and Treatment
TLDR
The cornerstone of RCVS management remains largely supportive with bed rest and analgesics and removal of precipitating factors and Invasive neurointerventional techniques should be reserved for severe deteriorating cases.
Thunderclap headache and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome: Current theory and accumulated data
TLDR
Although prescription of triptans for migraine is not suitable for patients with a history of RCVS, lasmiditan, a highly selective 5‐HT1F receptor agonist, may be suitable in such cases, with prescription of bed rest, analgesics, and the removal of precipitating factors.
The reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in association with venlafaxine and methenamine
TLDR
Although RCVS is relatively uncommon, it should be considered in the differential of those presenting with thunderclap headache, and the first report to implicate methenamine is reported.
Severe Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome with Large Posterior Cerebral Infarction.
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction with thunderclap headache
TLDR
Clinical findings and appropriate treatment methods for RCVS are explored through the case study of a female patient who experienced severe headache upon defecation, finding it difficult differentiate RCVS from other headaches.
Postpartum Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Presenting with Radiological Plethora
TLDR
Clinicians should be aware of the typical and the atypical presentation of RCVS along with the radiological findings with the potential complications and early suspicion and detection in the emergency help in recovery and reducing morbidity.
A case of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome and cavernous hemangioma: just a coincidence?
TLDR
Many conditions have overlapping clinical, imaging, or angiographic features with RCVS, including primary angiitis of central nervous system (CNS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), cervical artery dissection, and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.
Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome - A Systematic Approach
TLDR
Differentiating RCVS from other causes of thunderclap headache can significantly alter the management options and further prognosis.
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References

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Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome
TLDR
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is characterised by severe headaches with or without seizures and focal neurological deficits, and constriction of cerebral arteries which resolves spontaneously in 1–3 months, with no definite effect on the haemorrhagic and ischaemic complications.
Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome with Posterior Leucoencephalopathy after Oral Contraceptive Pills
TLDR
A patient with angiographically confirmed RCVS whose MRI showed reversible brain oedema is reported, suggesting an overlap between RCVS and the reversible posterior leucoencephalopathy syndrome, supporting a role for female reproductive hormones in precipitating this overlap syndrome.
Narrative Review: Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndromes
TLDR
This narrative review, by specialists in the field of rheumatology, headache, and stroke, will outline the cause and pathophysiology, symptoms and signs, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of RCVS and areas of uncertainty.
An often unrecognized cause of thunderclap headache: reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome
TLDR
Two patients with TCH due to RCVS are described and the probable precipitating factor, namely, cannabis and an anti-migraine drug is described and repeated transcranial Doppler ultrasonography can be a reliable non-invasive investigation to monitor the effect of treatment and demonstrate reversibility of the vasoconstriction.
Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case following reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome masquerading as subarachnoid haemorrhage
TLDR
The case of a 51-year-old woman who presented to hospital following a thunderclap headache, initially thought to be secondary to a subarachnoid haemorrhage, is presented, the first reported case of RCVS with concomitant PRES and cerebral infarction.
Reversible Segmental Cerebral Vasoconstriction (Call-Fleming Syndrome): Are Calcium Channel Inhibitors A Potential Treatment Option?
TLDR
The present case illustrates that calcium channel inhibitors may be an effective therapy for segmental cerebral arterial vasoconstriction, however, more clinical data are needed to prove this observation.
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome presenting as subarachnoid hemorrhage, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy, and cerebral infarction.
TLDR
A severe case of a 53-year-old woman with RCVS having an unruptured cerebral aneurysm and presenting as cortical subarachnoid hemorrhage, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, and cerebral infarction is reported.
Thunderclap headache, reversible cerebral arterial vasoconstriction, and unruptured aneurysms
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  • Medicine
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
  • 2002
TLDR
It is interesting that, in addition to segmental vasoconstriction, cerebral angiograms in patients with the Call-Fleming and some other vasconstriction syndromes can have areas of vasodilatation beyond the normal diameter of the artery.
Segmental cerebral vasoconstriction: Successful treatment of secondary cerebral ischaemia with intravenous prostacyclin
TLDR
This case had several clinical characteristics and radiological findings reminiscent of those of the ‘segmental reversible vasoconstriction syndrome’, sometimes called the Call–Fleming syndrome, although not fully compatible.
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