Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: a Comprehensive Update

@article{Mehdi2014ReversibleCV,
  title={Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome: a Comprehensive Update},
  author={Ali A Mehdi and Rula A Hajj-Ali},
  journal={Current Pain and Headache Reports},
  year={2014},
  volume={18},
  pages={1-10}
}
  • A. Mehdi, R. Hajj-Ali
  • Published 20 August 2014
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Current Pain and Headache Reports
Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is a clinico-radiological syndrome characterized by recurrent thunderclap headache, with or without neurologic symptoms, and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries. RCVS affects patients in various racial and ethnic groups and in all age groups, although most commonly in the fourth decade of life. Many conditions and exposures have been linked to RCVS, including vasoactive drugs and the peripartum period. Disturbance of the cerebral… 
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The patient was a 9‐year‐old boy with a heterozygous TGFBR2 mutation, manifesting camptodactyly, talipes equinovarus, and lamboid craniosynostosis, who complained of severe recurrent headaches and was diagnosed as having RCVS, the first patient with LDS presenting with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS).
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A patient who presented with a clinically typical RCVS and developed focal neurological symptoms and signs despite oral treatment with calcium channel blockers was treated with intra‐arterial milrinone, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, which resulted in a rapid and sustained neurological improvement.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
A series of 6 cases of RCVS that highlight the imaging features across multiple modalities are presented and radiologists must understand the clinical and radiologic features so as to better guide imaging algorithms and facilitate diagnosis.
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TLDR
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