Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome, Part 1: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Clinical Course

@article{Miller2015ReversibleCV,
  title={Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome, Part 1: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Clinical Course},
  author={Timothy R Miller and Ravishankar Shivashankar and Mahmoud Mossa-Basha and Dheeraj Gandhi},
  journal={American Journal of Neuroradiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={36},
  pages={1392 - 1399}
}
SUMMARY: Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is a clinical and radiologic syndrome that represents a common presentation of a diverse group of disorders. The syndrome is characterized by thunderclap headache and reversible vasoconstriction of cerebral arteries, which can either be spontaneous or related to an exogenous trigger. The pathophysiology of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome is unknown, though alterations in cerebral vascular tone are thought to be a key… 

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