Reversed sexual size dimorphism in raptors: evaluation of the hypotheses in kestrels breeding in a temporally changing environment

@article{Massemin2000ReversedSS,
  title={Reversed sexual size dimorphism in raptors: evaluation of the hypotheses in kestrels breeding in a temporally changing environment},
  author={Sylvie Massemin and Erkki Korpim{\"a}ki and J{\"u}rgen Wiehn},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2000},
  volume={124},
  pages={26-32}
}
Abstract Reversed sexual size dimorphism (RSD, females larger than males) is commonly found in birds of prey. We used kestrels (Falco tinnunculus), breeding in western Finland in a temporally varying environment of 3-year vole cycles, to assess current hypotheses for the evolution and maintenance of RSD. Our 12-year data showed only weak correlations between parental size and breeding parameters (laying date, clutch size and the number of fledglings produced). The degree of RSD per se was… Expand

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper

Selection on body size in a raptor with pronounced reversed sexual size dimorphism: are bigger females better?
TLDR
It is argued that, together, these results are indicative of selection favoring an increase in female body size and a reduction or maintenance in male body size, consistent only with the predictions of the intrasexual competition hypothesis. Expand
Higher reproductive success of small males and greater recruitment of large females may explain strong reversed sexual dimorphism (RSD) in the northern goshawk
TLDR
It is concluded that RSD may be favoured in this goshawk population because small males tend to enjoy higher reproductive success and large females greater recruitment, rather than by reproductive success as previously postulated. Expand
The Evolution of Reversed Sexual Size Dimorphism in Hawks, Falcons and Owls: A Comparative Study
TLDR
The results suggest that RSD in hawks, falcons and owls evolved due to natural-selection pressures rather than sexual-selection pressure, consistent with the small-male hypothesis. Expand
Size-Related Advantages for Reproduction in a Slightly Dimorphic Raptor: Opposite Trends between the Sexes
TLDR
The fact that the reproductive advantages associated with body size and condition were observed in an essentially monomorphic population the same selection pressures previously found in species with marked dimorphism suggests that such reproductive advantages may be counterbalanced in the study model by opposite selection pressures during other stages of the life cycle. Expand
Reversed sexual dimorphism in tawny owls, Strix aluco, correlates with duty division in breeding effort
TLDR
The study provides further evidence that selection for males to be light and energetically efficient foragers is the main evolutionary force behind RSD in raptorial birds, even when the prey base is confined by territoriality. Expand
Reversed sexual size dimorphism: body size patterns in sexes of lesser kestrels (Falco naumanni) in the Ikh Nart Nature Reserve, Mongolia
TLDR
The degree of RSD in lesser kestrels (Falco naumanni), a small falcon breeding in Mongolia, is investigated to contribute to a better understanding of body size variation based on gender for other birds of prey that do not have plumage dimorphism. Expand
Size-mediated dominance and begging behaviour in Eurasian kestrel broods
TLDR
The results show a clear response of food provisioning by parents to begging display of nestlings, and suggest that the advantage of female nestlings in food acquisition was due to their competitive superiority over male sibling nest-mates in scramble competition for monopolizeable prey. Expand
Sex-specific foraging behaviour in a seabird with reversed sexual dimorphism: the red-footed booby
TLDR
Foraging differences are probably the reason for the differential breeding investment observed in boobies, and are likely to be involved in the evolution and maintenance of RSD. Expand
Sexual size dimorphism in northern giant petrels: ecological correlates and scaling
TLDR
The increase and maintenance of sexual size dimorphism in giant petrels is more consistent with an ecological causation rather than a result of sexual selection, and mechanisms maintaining sexual sizeDimorphism by ecological factors may be operating. Expand
Sexual size dimorphism in northern giant petrels: ecological correlates and scaling
TLDR
The increase and maintenance of sexual size dimorphism in giant petrels is more consistent with an ecological causation rather than a result of sexual selection, and mechanisms maintaining sexual sizeDimorphism by ecological factors may be operating. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 61 REFERENCES
Adaptive advantages of reversed sexual size dimorphism in European owls
TLDR
A new hypothesis for sex dimorphism in terms of mass is advanced, namely that females are larger because larger bodies take longer to starve and can stand lower ambient temperatures without increasing heat production. Expand
Selection for reduced male size in raptorial birds: the possible roles of female choice and mate guarding
TLDR
Three hypothetical mechanisms which would increase the fitness of small males are presented, which are based on the assumptions that smaller prey is more abundant than larger prey and that smaller raptors capture prey more frequently than larger ones. Expand
THE EVOLUTION OF REVERSED SEXUAL DIMORPHISM IN OWLS: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF POSSIBLE SELECTIVE FACTORS
TLDR
The primary premise in the analysis is that if a given trait was important in the evolution of RSD it should be exhibited to a greater degree in highly dimorphic species than in less Dimorphic ones. Expand
Reversed sexual size dimorphism in Tengmalm's owl: is small male size adaptive?
TLDR
Reversed sexual size dimorphism of Tengmalm's owls was studied during 1981-1990 under fluctuating food conditions in western Finland with no clear evidence for the starvation, female reproductive effort, female dominance and sexual selection hypotheses found. Expand
Reversed size dimorphism in birds of prey, especially in Tengmalm's Owl Aegolius funereus: a test of the "starvation hypothesis"
TLDR
Data from Finnish owls did not support the hypothesis that the need to defend the nest has caused the evolution of larger females, but partly agreed with the "starvation hypothesis", which states that selection acts on owl females to withstand food shortage in the breeding season. Expand
A test of male mating and hunting success in the kestrel: the advantages of smallness?
TLDR
It is argued that females may prefer to pair with smaller males, because they have higher flight performance and better hunting success than heavier males, and by doing so, females may gain direct breeding advantages. Expand
Female choice in the kestrel under different availability of mating options
TLDR
It seems that females cannot be choosy at all in years of low kestrel density, and mainly appear to rely on male morphological characteristics when choosing a mate, but since the mating decision has to be made quickly, it is difficult for them to predict the future feeding ability of males. Expand
Reversed size dimorphism is raptors: can we tell which sex changed size?
TLDR
It is argued that patterns 1 and 2 provided a clue as to how reversed size dimorphism in Falconiformis evolved, namely by females becoming larger while retaining their ancestral (male-sized) egg, and that pattern 3 must be taken into account in any explanation of why RSD evolved. Expand
Clutch size of kestrels : seasonal decline and experimental evidence for food limitation under fluctuating food conditions
TLDR
The result, that variation in food abundance can alter the relationship between clutch size and laying date, supports the quality hypothesis (that differences in quality between individual birds and/or their territories may result in the seasonal decline of clutch size) and suggests that food is limiting clutch size in kestrels both during the egg-laying and nestling periods, and not only at low but also at high levels of natural food abundance. Expand
The Evolution of Reversed Sexual Dimorphism in Size
TLDR
The comparative method appears to be simultaneously the best and easiest method of testing these hypotheses on reversed sexual dimorphism. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...