Reversal in time order of interactive events: Collision of inclined rods

@article{Iyer2008ReversalIT,
  title={Reversal in time order of interactive events: Collision of inclined rods},
  author={Chandru Iyer and G. M. Prabhu},
  journal={arXiv: Classical Physics},
  year={2008}
}
In the rod and hole paradox as described by Rindler (1961 Am. J. Phys. 29 365-6), a rigid rod moves at high speed over a table towards a hole of the same size. Observations from the inertial frames of the rod and slot are widely different. Rindler explains these differences by the concept of differing perceptions in rigidity. Gron and Johannesen (1993 Eur. J. Phys. 14 97-100) confirmed this aspect by computer simulation where the shapes of the rods are different as observed from the co-moving… Expand
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