Revealed by conspicuousness: distractive markings reduce camouflage

@inproceedings{Stevens2013RevealedBC,
  title={Revealed by conspicuousness: distractive markings reduce camouflage},
  author={Martin Stevens and Kate L. A. Marshall and Jolyon Troscianko and Sive Finlay and Dan Burnand and Sarah Louise Chadwick},
  year={2013}
}
Animal camouflage is a textbook example of natural selection. Despite substantial progress, one historical theory remains controversial: that conspicuous "distractive" markings draw predator attention away from the prey outline, preventing detection. Here, we present evidence from 4 experiments to resolve this controversy. In field experiments, we measured bird predation on artificial cryptic prey that were either unmarked or had distractive markings of various attributes (number, color, and… CONTINUE READING

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 25 CITATIONS

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 REFERENCES

Predator perception and the interrelation between different forms of protective coloration

  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2007
VIEW 6 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Disruptive coloration provides camouflage independent of background matching

  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2006
VIEW 5 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Animal camouflage: current issues and new perspectives

  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2008
VIEW 8 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Defining disruptive coloration and distinguishing its functions

  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2008
VIEW 7 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL