Return to Work After Cancer in the UK: Attitudes and Experiences of Line Managers

@article{Amir2009ReturnTW,
  title={Return to Work After Cancer in the UK: Attitudes and Experiences of Line Managers},
  author={Z. Amir and P. Wynn and F. Chan and D. Strauser and S. Whitaker and K. Luker},
  journal={Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation},
  year={2009},
  volume={20},
  pages={435-442}
}
Introduction With improvements in diagnosis, treatment and survival rates, returning to work after cancer is of increasing importance to individuals and employers. Although line managers can play a potentially important role in the return to work process, research thus far has focused on the return to work process from the perspective of cancer survivors. Aim To explore the attitudes of line managers towards employees with a cancer diagnosis. Methods A short self-administered, on-line… Expand
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