Retrieval-Induced Forgetting and Executive Control

@article{Romn2009RetrievalInducedFA,
  title={Retrieval-Induced Forgetting and Executive Control},
  author={Patricia E. Rom{\'a}n and Maria Felipa Soriano and Carlos J. G{\'o}mez-Ariza and Mar{\'i}a Teresa Bajo},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={20},
  pages={1053 - 1058}
}
Retrieving information from long-term memory can lead people to forget previously irrelevant related information. Some researchers have proposed that this retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) effect is mediated by inhibitory executive-control mechanisms recruited to overcome interference. We assessed whether inhibition in RTF depends on executive processes. The RIF effect observed in a standard retrieval-practice condition was compared to that observed in two different conditions in which… 

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An investigation of response competition in retrieval-induced forgetting
Abstract It has been demonstrated that retrieval practice on a subset of studied items can cause forgetting of different related studied items. This retrieval-induced forgetting (the RIF effect) has
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