Retinol, vitamins A, C, and E and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression

@article{Fulan2011RetinolVA,
  title={Retinol, vitamins A, C, and E and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression},
  author={Hu Fulan and Jiang Changxing and Wang Yi Baina and Zhang Wencui and Ling Chunqing and Wang Fan and Li Dandan and Sun Dianjun and Wang Tong and Pang Da and Zhao Yashuang},
  journal={Cancer Causes \& Control},
  year={2011},
  volume={22},
  pages={1383-1396}
}
ObjectiveTo comprehensively summarize the associations between retinol, vitamins A, C, and E and breast cancer, and quantitatively estimate their dose–response relationships.MethodsWe searched PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases (from January 1982 to 15 March 2011) and the references of the relevant articles in English with sufficient information to estimate relative risk or odds ratio and the 95% confidence intervals, and comparable categories of vitamins. Two reviewers independently… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
There was an inverse correlation between vitamin A, beta-carotene and lycopene intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer, which was more prominent in case-control study subgroup.
Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis
TLDR
It is suggested that the higher intake of vitamin C might have a protective effect against lung cancer, especially in the United States, although this conclusion needs to be confirmed.
Association between vitamin C intake and lung cancer: a dose-response
TLDR
It is suggested that the higher intake of vitamin C might have a protective effect against lung cancer, especially in the United States, although this conclusion needs to be confirmed.
Vitamin E consumption and the risk of bladder cancer.
TLDR
It is indicated that vitamin E consumption was inversely associated with the risk of bladder cancer.
Dietary Antioxidant Vitamins and Minerals and Breast Cancer Risk: Prospective Results from the SUN Cohort
TLDR
The results did not suggest significant protective associations between dietary vitamins A, C, and E, selenium, or zinc and BC risk and showed an inverse association between vitamin E intake and postmenopausal BC.
Vitamin C intake and multiple health outcomes: an umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses
TLDR
Dose–response analysis showed that vitamin C intake was associated with reduced risk of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD), oesophageal cancer, gastric cancer, cervical cancer and lung cancer with an increment of 50–100 mg per day.
Vitamin C supplement intake and postmenopausal breast cancer risk: interaction with dietary vitamin C.
TLDR
It is observed that vitamin C supplement use was associated with increased postmenopausal breast cancer risk in women with high vitamin C intake from foods, and this data suggest a potential U- or J-shaped relation between total vitamin C Intake and post menopausal breast Cancer risk that deserves further investigation.
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References

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TLDR
Large intakes of vitamin C or E did not protect women in this study from breast cancer; any benefit of vitamin A supplements may be limited to women with diets low in vitamin A.
Intake of vitamins A, C, and E and postmenopausal breast cancer. The Iowa Women's Health Study.
TLDR
The association between dietary antioxidant vitamin intake and the risk of breast cancer was examined in a prospective study of 34,387 postmenopausal women in Iowa, and results provide little evidence that intake of these vitamins is associated with breast cancer risk.
Dietary fiber, vitamins A, C, and E, and risk of breast cancer: a cohort study
TLDR
Small, statistically nonsignificant reductions in risk were observed with increasing intake of dietary retinol, β-carotene, and vitamin C, but the magnitude of these associations was reduced after adjustment for other dietary factors.
Vitamins A, C and E and the risk of breast cancer: results from a case-control study in Greece
TLDR
The inverse association observed with β- carotene intake is slightly weaker than the association previously observed with vegetable intake in these data, raising the possibility that the observed β-carotene effect is accounted for by another component of vegetables.
Vitamins C and E, retinol, beta-carotene and dietary fibre in relation to breast cancer risk: a prospective cohort study.
TLDR
The findings do not suggest a strong role, if any, for intake of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, retinol, dietary fibre, vegetables, fruit and potatoes in the aetiology of breast cancer.
Fruits, vegetables, and micronutrients in relation to breast cancer modified by menopause and hormone receptor status.
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TLDR
An inverse association for fruit and vegetable intake among postmenopausal but not premenopausal breast cancer, which may be more pronounced among women with ER+ tumors is supported, but results were less consistent for micronutrients.
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Intakes of vitamins A, C, and E, folate, and carotenoids have been hypothesized to reduce the risk of breast cancer. However, previous epidemiological studies on these nutrients and breast cancer
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TLDR
Vitamin E supplementation was not associated with a reduction in total mortality, cancer incidence, or cancer mortality, but it was related with a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of prostate cancer.
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TLDR
No significant associations were observed between serum levels of these micronutrients and risk of proliferative BBD or breast cancer in postmenopausal women in the Boston, MA (United States) area.
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