Retinal haemorrhage in abusive head trauma

@article{Morad2010RetinalHI,
  title={Retinal haemorrhage in abusive head trauma},
  author={Yair Morad and Tamara Wygnansky-Jaffe and Alex V Levin},
  journal={Clinical \& Experimental Ophthalmology},
  year={2010},
  volume={38}
}
Paediatric abusive head injury may have grave consequences, especially when characterized by repetitive acceleration–deceleration forces (shaken baby syndrome). Death occurs in approximately 30% and permanent neurologic damage in up to 80% of the victims. Retinal haemorrhages are a cardinal sign seen in approximately 85% of cases. In most cases haemorrhages are preretinal, intraretinal and subretinal, too numerous to count, and involving the entire retinal surface extending to the ora serrata… Expand
Retinal haemorrhages in infants, abusive head trauma and the ophthalmologist
  • G. Gole
  • Medicine
  • Clinical & experimental ophthalmology
  • 2010
TLDR
Two reviews in the current issue of the journal give guidance to the ophthalmologist seeing a patient with suspected non-accidental injury, and the current understanding of the pathogenesis of retinal haemorrhages in relation to AHT is presented. Expand
Abusive head trauma and the eye in infancy
A child suspected of having an abusive head trauma (AHT) is referred by paediatricians to an ophthalmologist for evaluation. The incidence of abusive head injury in children is highest in infancy andExpand
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TLDR
A 5‐month‐old male infant with bilateral retinal hemosiderin depositions due to hemorrhages sustained from AHT occurring 32 months prior to death is described. Expand
Consensus statement on abusive head trauma in infants and young children
TLDR
This consensus document reduces confusion by recommending to judges and jurors the tools necessary to distinguish genuine evidence-based opinions of the relevant medical community from legal arguments or etiological speculations that are unwarranted by the clinical findings, medical evidence and evidence- based literature. Expand
Photographic assessment of retinal hemorrhages in infant head injury: the Childhood Hemorrhagic Retinopathy Study.
  • G. Bhardwaj, M. Jacobs, +5 authors M. Coroneo
  • Medicine
  • Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
  • 2017
TLDR
It is confirmed that RH in infants with head injury have a high positive likelihood ratio for AHT and a severe hemorrhagic retinopathy, particularly in association with perimacular folds or macular retinoschisis, has the highest positive predictive value for A HT. Expand
Indirect Traumas Affecting The Posterior Segment
TLDR
This paper focuses on the indirect effects of distant traumas on the posterior segment of an eye, which is characterized by vitreous and preretinal hemorrhages in trauma-related hemorrhagic vitreoretinopathies. Expand
Extramedullary Hematopoiesis in Abusive Head Trauma
TLDR
Extramedullary hematopoiesis of the choroid was observed in an otherwise clear cut case of abusive head trauma with bilateral retinal hemorrhage, optic nerve sheath hemorrhage and peripapillary intrascleral hemorrhage. Expand
Predictors of long-term neurological outcomes in non-accidental head injury
TLDR
Bilateral macular retinoschisis on acute presentation of NAI is associated with a seven-fold and unilateral with a four-fold increase in the development of a poor neurological outcome and eventual death. Expand
Update on abusive head trauma
TLDR
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Ocular Findings in Newborns
TLDR
Traumatic retinal hemorrhage may develop from the trauma of birth, accidents, or abusive head trauma (AHT), a form of non-accidental head injury formerly known as shaken baby syndrome. Expand
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