Rethinking the definition of episodic memory.

@article{Madan2020RethinkingTD,
  title={Rethinking the definition of episodic memory.},
  author={Christopher R. Madan},
  journal={Canadian journal of experimental psychology = Revue canadienne de psychologie experimentale},
  year={2020},
  volume={74 3},
  pages={
          183-192
        }
}
  • C. Madan
  • Published 1 September 2020
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Canadian journal of experimental psychology = Revue canadienne de psychologie experimentale
The definition of episodic memory, as proposed by Tulving, includes a requirement of conscious recall. As we are unable to assess this aspect of memory in nonhuman animals, many researchers have referred to demonstrations of what would otherwise be considered episodic memory as "episodic-like memory." Here the definition of episodic memory is reconsidered based on objective criteria. While the primary focus of this reevaluation is based on work with nonhuman animals, considerations are also… 
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