Rethinking health care labor.

@article{Kocher2011RethinkingHC,
  title={Rethinking health care labor.},
  author={Robert P Kocher and Nikhil Sahni},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2011},
  volume={365 15},
  pages={
          1370-2
        }
}
Of the $2.6 trillion spent in 2010 on U.S. health care, 56% consisted of wages for health care workers. Health care, as currently designed and delivered, is very labor-intensive. Yet unlike other sectors, health care has seen no recent gains in labor productivity. 

Topics from this paper

Health sector employment growth calls for improvements in labor productivity.
TLDR
It is argued that labor productivity of a growing health work force needs more attention and more research is needed to identify effective policy measures of labor productivity enhancement including enhanced efforts to develop comparable productivity indicators in these areas. Expand
A key to slower health spending growth worldwide will be unlocking innovation to reduce the labor-intensity of care.
TLDR
Policy makers should focus on labor-saving innovations; reform reimbursement systems to encourage them; tackle professionals' resistance; and remove regulatory barriers to redesign health services around patient self-care approaches. Expand
The Coming Primary Care Revolution
TLDR
The coming primary care revolution ought to be guided by the following design principles: Payment must adequately support primary care and reward value, including non-visit-based care. Expand
Reconfiguring health workforce policy so that education, training, and actual delivery of care are closely connected.
TLDR
How neither regulatory policies nor market forces are keeping up with a rapidly changing delivery system is highlighted and it is argued that training and education should be connected more closely to the actual delivery of care. Expand
The Growing Executive-Physician Wage Gap in Major US Nonprofit Hospitals and Burden of Nonclinical Workers on the US Healthcare System
TLDR
There is a fast-rising wage gap between the top executives of major nonprofit centers and physicians that reflects the substantial, and growing, cost of nonclinical worker wages to the US healthcare system. Expand
The dormant National Health Care Workforce Commission needs congressional funding to fulfill its promise.
TLDR
The National Health Care Workforce Commission has never met and is not operational, and is needed to recommend policies that would help the nation achieve the goals of increased access to high-quality care and better preparation, configuration, and distribution of the nation's health workforce. Expand
Affairs Delivery Of Care Are Closely Connected Reconfiguring Health Workforce Policy So That Education , Training , And Actual
There is growing consensus that the health care workforce in the United States needs to be reconfigured to meet the needs of a health care system that is being rapidly and permanently redesigned.Expand
Strategic health workforce planning
ABSTRACT Analysts predict impending shortages in the health care workforce, yet wages for health care workers already account for over half of U.S. health expenditures. It is thus increasinglyExpand
Best Care at Lower Cost: The Path to Continuously Learning Health Care in America
TLDR
The Imperatives for Continuous Learning, Best Care, and Lower Costs and the Path to Achieving the Vision are outlined. Expand
Understanding the role of the health workforce in driving health spending: trends across OECD countries and implications for the US
Understanding the role of the health workforce in driving health spending: trends across OECD countries and implications for the US
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
Compound Annual Growth Rate), Broken into Labor Productivity Growth and Employment Growth in Various Sectors of the U
  • Real Sector GrowthS. Economy
  • 1990
Real sector growth is defined as the value added by the industry to the gross domestic product. Data are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of Economic Analysis
  • Real sector growth is defined as the value added by the industry to the gross domestic product. Data are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of Economic Analysis