Rethinking big data in digital humanitarianism: practices, epistemologies, and social relations

@article{Burns2014RethinkingBD,
  title={Rethinking big data in digital humanitarianism: practices, epistemologies, and social relations},
  author={Ryan Burns},
  journal={GeoJournal},
  year={2014},
  volume={80},
  pages={477-490}
}
  • Ryan Burns
  • Published 12 October 2014
  • Sociology
  • GeoJournal
Spatial technologies and the organizations around them, such as the Standby Task Force and Ushahidi, are increasingly changing the ways crises and emergencies are addressed. Within digital humanitarianism, Big Data has featured strongly in recent efforts to improve digital humanitarian work. This shift toward social media and other Big Data sources has entailed unexamined assumptions about technological progress, social change, and the kinds of knowledge captured by data. These assumptions… 

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