Rethinking Anti-Immigration Rhetoric after the Oslo and Utøya Terror Attacks

@article{Wiggen2012RethinkingAR,
  title={Rethinking Anti-Immigration Rhetoric after the Oslo and Ut{\o}ya Terror Attacks},
  author={Mette Wiggen},
  journal={New Political Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={34},
  pages={585 - 604}
}
This article examines right-wing populism and populist rhetoric in Norway preceding the July 22, 2011 terror attacks at Utøya and in Oslo. It describes how the mainstream media, academics, and political parties have appealed to the public in an increasingly populist fashion and have spread fear about immigration, immigrants, and integration. It argues that while the populist right-wing Progress Party has adopted immigration and integration as its main cause and has gained support because of it… Expand
How critical is the event? Multicultural Norway after 22 July 2011
Right-wing Terrorism and Out-group Trust: The Anatomy of a Terrorist Backlash
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