Retaliatory Homicide: Concentrated Disadvantage and Neighborhood Culture

@article{Kubrin2003RetaliatoryHC,
  title={Retaliatory Homicide: Concentrated Disadvantage and Neighborhood Culture},
  author={Charis E. Kubrin and Ronald Weitzer},
  journal={Social Problems},
  year={2003},
  volume={50},
  pages={157-180}
}
Much of the research on violent crime is situated within an exclusively structural or subcultural framework. Some recent work, however, argues that these unidimensional approaches are inherently limited and that more attention needs to be given to the intersection of structural and cultural determinants of violence. The present study takes up this challenge by examining both structural and cultural influences on one underexamined type of homicide: retaliatory killings. Using quantitative data… 

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