Resurrecting the ecological underpinnings of ocean plankton blooms.

@article{Behrenfeld2014ResurrectingTE,
  title={Resurrecting the ecological underpinnings of ocean plankton blooms.},
  author={Michael J. Behrenfeld and Emmanuel S. Boss},
  journal={Annual review of marine science},
  year={2014},
  volume={6},
  pages={
          167-94
        }
}
Nutrient and light conditions control phytoplankton division rates in the surface ocean and, it is commonly believed, dictate when and where high concentrations, or blooms, of plankton occur. Yet after a century of investigation, rates of phytoplankton biomass accumulation show no correlation with cell division rates. Consequently, factors controlling plankton blooms remain highly controversial. In this review, we endorse the view that blooms are not governed by abiotic factors controlling cell… 

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