Restriction of plant roots in boreal forest organic soils affects the microbial community but does not change the dominance from ectomycorrhizal to saprotrophic fungi.

@article{Sieti2019RestrictionOP,
  title={Restriction of plant roots in boreal forest organic soils affects the microbial community but does not change the dominance from ectomycorrhizal to saprotrophic fungi.},
  author={Outi-Maaria Sieti{\"o} and Minna Santalahti and Anuliina Putkinen and Sylwia Adamczyk and Hui Sun and Jussi Heinonsalo},
  journal={FEMS microbiology ecology},
  year={2019},
  volume={95 9}
}
  • Outi-Maaria Sietiö, Minna Santalahti, +3 authors Jussi Heinonsalo
  • Published in FEMS microbiology ecology 2019
  • DOI:10.1093/femsec/fiz133
Boreal forest soils store significant amounts of carbon and are cohabited by saprotrophic and ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM). The 'Gadgil effect' implies antagonistic interactions between saprotrophic fungi and ECM. Plant photosynthates support the competitive fitness of the ECM, and may also shape the soil bacterial communities. Many 'Gadgil effect' experiments have focused on litter layer (OL) or have litter and root-fragments present, and thus possibly favor the saprotrophs. We compared how the… CONTINUE READING

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