Restoring Phineas Gage: A 150th Retrospective

@article{Macmillan2000RestoringPG,
  title={Restoring Phineas Gage: A 150th Retrospective},
  author={Malcolm Macmillan},
  journal={Journal of the History of the Neurosciences},
  year={2000},
  volume={9},
  pages={46 - 66}
}
  • M. Macmillan
  • Published 1 April 2000
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
September 13 1998 marked the 150th anniversary of the accident to Phineas Gage, one of the most famous cases of survival after massive injury to the brain, and certainly the most famous case of personality change after brain damage. For this article a sample of the current literature about Gage was examined. It was found that although his case is mentioned in about 60% of introductory textbooks in psychology, there is a good deal of inaccuracy in what has been written about him. Similar… 
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