Restoration of fluid balance after exercise-induced dehydration: effects of alcohol consumption.

@article{Shirreffs1997RestorationOF,
  title={Restoration of fluid balance after exercise-induced dehydration: effects of alcohol consumption.},
  author={S. Shirreffs and R. Maughan},
  journal={Journal of applied physiology},
  year={1997},
  volume={83 4},
  pages={
          1152-8
        }
}
The effect of alcohol consumption on the restoration of fluid and electrolyte balance after exercise-induced dehydration [2.01 +/- 0.10% (SD) of body mass] was investigated. Drinks containing 0, 1, 2, and 4% alcohol were consumed over 60 min beginning 30 min after the end of exercise; a different beverage was consumed in each of four trials. The volume consumed (2,212 +/- 153 ml) was equivalent to 150% of body mass loss. Peak urine flow rate occurred later (P = 0.024) with the 4% beverage. The… Expand
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