Resting state cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity networks: a comparison of anatomical and self-organizing map approaches

Abstract

The cerebellum plays a role in a wide variety of complex behaviors. In order to better understand the role of the cerebellum in human behavior, it is important to know how this structure interacts with cortical and other subcortical regions of the brain. To date, several studies have investigated the cerebellum using resting-state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI; Krienen and Buckner, 2009; O'Reilly et al., 2010; Buckner et al., 2011). However, none of this work has taken an anatomically-driven lobular approach. Furthermore, though detailed maps of cerebral cortex and cerebellum networks have been proposed using different network solutions based on the cerebral cortex (Buckner et al., 2011), it remains unknown whether or not an anatomical lobular breakdown best encompasses the networks of the cerebellum. Here, we used fcMRI to create an anatomically-driven connectivity atlas of the cerebellar lobules. Timecourses were extracted from the lobules of the right hemisphere and vermis. We found distinct networks for the individual lobules with a clear division into "motor" and "non-motor" regions. We also used a self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm to parcellate the cerebellum. This allowed us to investigate redundancy and independence of the anatomically identified cerebellar networks. We found that while anatomical boundaries in the anterior cerebellum provide functional subdivisions of a larger motor grouping defined using our SOM algorithm, in the posterior cerebellum, the lobules were made up of sub-regions associated with distinct functional networks. Together, our results indicate that the lobular boundaries of the human cerebellum are not necessarily indicative of functional boundaries, though anatomical divisions can be useful. Additionally, driving the analyses from the cerebellum is key to determining the complete picture of functional connectivity within the structure.

DOI: 10.3389/fnana.2012.00031

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@inproceedings{Bernard2012RestingSC, title={Resting state cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity networks: a comparison of anatomical and self-organizing map approaches}, author={Jessica A. Bernard and Rachael D. Seidler and Kelsey M. Hassevoort and Bryan L. Benson and Robert C. Welsh and Jillian Lee Wiggins and Susanne M. Jaeggi and Martin Buschkuehl and Christopher S. Monk and John Jonides and Scott Peltier}, booktitle={Front. Neuroanat.}, year={2012} }