Resting heart rate is a risk factor for cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality: the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry.

@article{Greenland1999RestingHR,
  title={Resting heart rate is a risk factor for cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality: the Chicago Heart Association Detection Project in Industry.},
  author={P. Greenland and M. Daviglus and A. Dyer and K. Liu and C. Huang and J. Goldberger and J. Stamler},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={149 9},
  pages={
          853-62
        }
}
In a prospective cohort study, associations of resting heart rate with risk of coronary, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all-cause mortality in age-specific cohorts of black and white men and women were examined over 22 years of follow-up. Participants were employees from 84 companies and organizations in the Chicago, Illinois, area who volunteered for a screening examination. Participants included 9,706 men aged 18-39 years, 7,760 men aged 40-59 years, 1,321 men aged 60-74 years, 6,928… Expand
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