Responsibility Diffusion in Cooperative Collectives

@article{Forsyth2002ResponsibilityDI,
  title={Responsibility Diffusion in Cooperative Collectives},
  author={Donelson R. Forsyth and Linda E. Zyzniewski and Cheryl Giammanco},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={2002},
  volume={28},
  pages={54 - 65}
}
The authors examined questions about diffusion of responsibility in groups by asking group members to apportion responsibility for an outcome to each group member: Does responsibility diffuse more as groups increase in size but eventually level off in larger groups? Does responsibility diffuse equally, with each member getting an equal portion, or is it concentrated on certain individuals? Do group members apportion responsibility in ways that maximize their own self-esteem? Dyads attributed… 

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