Responses to object approach by a wide field visual neurone, the LGMD2 of the locust: Characterization and image cues

@article{Simmons1997ResponsesTO,
  title={Responses to object approach by a wide field visual neurone, the LGMD2 of the locust: Characterization and image cues},
  author={Peter J. Simmons and F. Claire Rind},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={1997},
  volume={180},
  pages={203-214}
}
  • P. Simmons, F. Rind
  • Published 14 February 1997
  • Computer Science
  • Journal of Comparative Physiology A
Abstract The LGMD2 belongs to a group of giant movement-detecting neurones which have fan-shaped arbors in the lobula of the locust optic lobe and respond to movements of objects. One of these neurones, the LGMD1, has been shown to respond directionally to movements of objects in depth, generating vigorous, maintained spike discharges during object approach. Here we compare the responses of the LGMD2 neurone with those of the LGMD1 to simulated movements of objects in depth and examine… 
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