Responses to Mantram Repetition Program from Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder: a qualitative analysis.

@article{Bormann2013ResponsesTM,
  title={Responses to Mantram Repetition Program from Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder: a qualitative analysis.},
  author={Jill E. Bormann and Samantha Hurst and Ann Kelly},
  journal={Journal of rehabilitation research and development},
  year={2013},
  volume={50 6},
  pages={
          769-84
        }
}
This study describes ways in which a Mantram Repetition Program (MRP) was used for managing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 65 outpatient Veterans with PTSD. The MRP consisted of six weekly group sessions (90 min/wk) on how to (1) choose and use a mantram, (2) slow down thoughts and behaviors, and (3) develop one-pointed attention for emotional self-regulation. Critical incident research technique interviews were conducted at 3 mo postintervention as part of a larger randomized… 

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