Responses of mechanoreceptors and thermoreceptors in skin of the snout of the echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus

@article{Iggo1985ResponsesOM,
  title={Responses of mechanoreceptors and thermoreceptors in skin of the snout of the echidna Tachyglossus aculeatus},
  author={Ainsley Iggo and A. K. Mcintyre and Uwe Proske},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences},
  year={1985},
  volume={223},
  pages={261 - 277}
}
  • A. Iggo, A. Mcintyre, U. Proske
  • Published 22 January 1985
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences
In echidnas anaesthetized with Chloralose, recordings were made, by electrophysiological means, of activity in filaments of nerve supplying receptors in the skin of the snout. In four animals, responses were recorded from a total of 33 receptors of which 29 were studied in detail. These included 14 slowly adapting mechanoreceptors with regular discharge, four slowly adapting receptors with irregular discharge and six rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors. Two of the rapidly adapting receptors were… Expand

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