Responses of free-ranging house sparrows to feed containing primary and secondary repellents

@article{Day2012ResponsesOF,
  title={Responses of free-ranging house sparrows to feed containing primary and secondary repellents},
  author={Tim D. Day and Barbara Kay Clapperton and Richard E.R. Porter and J. R. Waas and Lindsay Matthews},
  journal={New Zealand Journal of Crop and Horticultural Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={40},
  pages={127 - 138}
}
Abstract We recorded the responses of free-ranging house sparrows (Passer domesticus) to various concentrations of primary repellents and a secondary repellent. Wheat treated with either lime or neem oil was consumed by sparrows at the same rate over 24 hours as plain wheat at all doses. d-pulegone significantly reduced wheat consumption from day 1 onwards throughout the 4 days. Avex™ (containing the secondary repellent anthraquinone) did not significantly reduce wheat consumption on day 1 of… 
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Testing the effects of cassia leaf extract on the eating behavior of pigeons for application as a natural repellent showed that the averages of the bird food intake based on the maceration method were not different with a statistical significance (p>0.05), while the average consumption of the pigeon food processed by the Soxhlet extraction method had a lower average consumption.
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