Responses and feedbacks of coupled biogeochemical cycles to climate change: examples from terrestrial ecosystems

@article{Finzi2011ResponsesAF,
  title={Responses and feedbacks of coupled biogeochemical cycles to climate change: examples from terrestrial ecosystems},
  author={Adrien C. Finzi and Amy T. Austin and Elsa E Cleland and Serita D. Frey and Benjamin Z. Houlton and Matthew D. Wallenstein},
  journal={Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment},
  year={2011},
  volume={9},
  pages={61-67}
}
The biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) are fundamental to life on Earth. Because organisms require these elements in strict proportions, the cycles of C, N, and P are coupled at molecular to global scales through their effects on the biochemical reactions controlling primary production, respiration, and decomposition. The coupling of the C, N, and P cycles constrains organismal responses to climatic and atmospheric change, suggesting that present-day estimates… Expand

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