Response to Wayne, Nowak, and Phillips and Henry: use of molecular characters in conservation biology

@article{Dowling1992ResponseTW,
  title={Response to Wayne, Nowak, and Phillips and Henry: use of molecular characters in conservation biology},
  author={Thomas E. Dowling and Wendell L. Minckley and Michael E. Douglas and Paul C. Marsh and Bruce D. DeMarais},
  journal={Conservation Biology},
  year={1992},
  volume={6},
  pages={600-603}
}
In our recent letter (Dowling et al. 1992), we stated our concerns over two interrelated issues: (1) the use of genetic (i.e., molecular) characters in identifying species and their hybrids, and (2) the role of hybridization in evolution. The letter was stimulated by Wayne and Jenks' (1991) analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in the red wolf, Canis rufus, and subsequent interpretations presented in both the professional (e.g., Gittleman & Pimm 1991) and popular literature (e.g… Expand
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TLDR
Dowling et al. (1992) point out potential problems with the interpretations presented by Wayne and Jenks (1991) and emphasize that no single data set should receive priority consideration when addressing taxonomic issues and present data on red wolf behavior, ecology, and morphology that are considered when debating the origin of the species. Expand
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TLDR
I disagree with some of the conclusions of a letter by Dowling et al. (1992) regarding the use of "genetic" characters to delineate species and believe that only a few genetic changes may lead to speciation under this definition of species and therefore measures of "Genetic" divergence are not valid measures of specific status. Expand
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