Response Style Theory Revisited: Gender Differences and Stereotypes in Rumination and Distraction

@article{Strauss1997ResponseST,
  title={Response Style Theory Revisited: Gender Differences and Stereotypes in Rumination and Distraction},
  author={J. Strauss and Theresa Muday and Karlyn McNall and M. Wong},
  journal={Sex Roles},
  year={1997},
  volume={36},
  pages={771-792}
}
Response Style Theory [S. Nolen-Hoeksema (1987) “Sex Differences in Unipolar Depression: Evidence and Theory,” Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 101, pp. 259–282] suggests that, when depressed, women ruminate on their sad feelings while men distract themselves from theirs. We sought to examine this gender difference in more detail. In Study 1, 155 students provided stereotype ratings or self-reports of responses to depression. The stereotype ratings conformed precisely to Response Style Theory yet… Expand
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