Responding to the silent problems. Turkey. Developing suitable governmental programs to accomodate the changing needs of the growing and aging population is necessary and inevitable.

Abstract

The author believes that both socioeconomic change and expanded services had a significant impact upon Turkish couples' behavior, resulting in a smaller family norm. A recent survey indicates that the total fertility rate in the country declined to 2.7 from 5.7 in 1971. That sharp decline in fertility was coupled with an equally sharp decline in mortality, especially in the infant mortality rate. However, even though fertility decline has been observed in all regions, there remain significant variations in fertility rates across regions. There is substantial unmet need for contraceptives; in 1993, 12% of married women were not using a method even though they wanted to do so either for birth spacing or birth limiting. 37.6% of acceptors in urban areas and 50.8% of acceptors in rural areas use withdrawal as their main method of contraception. In 1993, there were an estimated 524 induced abortions per 1000 women in their childbearing years. That latter figure may, however, be an underestimate given the reluctance of Turkish people to publicly discuss abortion. The author considers change in population and family planning policy and argues that it will be necessary to develop governmental programs capable of coping with the changing needs of the growing and aging population in the areas of health, education, employment, social security, and other issues. Turkey's demographic changes demand a new population policy which is more integrated with development.

Cite this paper

@article{Tuncer1996RespondingTT, title={Responding to the silent problems. Turkey. Developing suitable governmental programs to accomodate the changing needs of the growing and aging population is necessary and inevitable.}, author={Burcu Baloş Tuncer}, journal={Integration}, year={1996}, volume={47}, pages={14-5} }