Respiratory control in aquatic insects dictates their vulnerability to global warming

@inproceedings{Verberk2013RespiratoryCI,
  title={Respiratory control in aquatic insects dictates their vulnerability to global warming},
  author={Wilco C E P Verberk and David T. Bilton},
  booktitle={Biology letters},
  year={2013}
}
Forecasting species responses to climatic warming requires knowledge of how temperature impacts may be exacerbated by other environmental stressors, hypoxia being a principal example in aquatic systems. Both stressors could interact directly as temperature affects both oxygen bioavailability and ectotherm oxygen demand. Insufficient oxygen has been shown to limit thermal tolerance in several aquatic ectotherms, although, the generality of this mechanism has been challenged for tracheated… CONTINUE READING
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