Resource limitation of tephritid flies on lesser burdock, Arctium minus (Hill) Bernh. (Compositae)

@article{Straw2004ResourceLO,
  title={Resource limitation of tephritid flies on lesser burdock, Arctium minus (Hill) Bernh. (Compositae)},
  author={Nigel A. Straw},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={86},
  pages={492-502}
}
  • N. Straw
  • Published 1 May 1991
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Oecologia
SummaryThe intensity of resource exploitation by phytophagous insects is usually considered to reflect population size. For populations of two flowerhead-attacking tephritid flies, however, the resources utilised were not related to the numbers of searching adults. Tephritis bardanae Schrank attacked 11–13% of the total flowerheads each year, and Cerajocera tussilaginis (Fab) 17–65%, despite much wider and uncorrelated variation in adult numbers. Analysis of field data showed that the… 
Faunal make‐up, host range and infestation rate of weevils and tephritid flies associated with flower heads of the thistle Cirsium (Cardueae: Astaraceae) in Japan
TLDR
In comparison with their European counterparts, the weevils and tephritids of the Japanese Cirsium are characterized by a lower species richness and a lower degree of specialization in usage of the thistle flower heads, with gall‐formers being distinctly under‐represented, and callus tissue‐feeders being absent.
Life history of the Onopordum capitulum weevil Larinus latus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
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The data suggest that movement of adults occurs both within and between patches and that variability in population size relative to the resource base is low, and L. latus may be considered a K-strategist which forms relatively stable populations over a fragmented habitat and which maintains its population integrity through a certain degree of annual redistribution.
The relative importance of resources and natural enemies in determining herbivore abundance: thistles, tephritids and parasitoids.
TLDR
Both top-down and bottom- up forces act to influence tephritid abundance, with bottom-up influences appearing to be the most important.
Sources of Spatial Variation in Herbivory and Performance of an Invasive Non-native Plant, Common Burdock (Arctium minus)
TLDR
Whether invasive populations of A. minus may benefit from enemy release therefore varies depending upon the location of the population, and latitudinal differences in herbivore damage cannot be explained by genotypic differences among plant populations, but is likely to result from the loss of herbivores from colder sites.
Relationship between capitulum size and pre-dispersal seed predation by insect larvae in common Asteraceae
TLDR
It is suggested that the characteristic capitulum size of each species may represent a trade-off between the opposing selection pressures of pollinators and pre-dispersal seed predators.
Differences in herbivore damage to Arctium minus in open and forest habitats in its non-native range
TLDR
In this study, herbivory on the non-native common burdock was compared between open and understory habitats, with high and low sunlight exposure respectively, on five sites in Ontario, Canada and it is suggested herbivor potentially may help to confine burdock primarily to open habitats.
lant ecotype affects interacting organisms across multiple rophic levels
In plant conservation and ecosystem restoration, plants are often translocated to ensure or enhance plant survival and perormance. While the effects of ecotype origin on the performance of
Direct and indirect effects of herbivores influencing plant invasions.
Non-native plants rarely escape damage by herbivores. Instead, upon arrival in a new region, they begin to acquire new enemies, replacing those they have lost during their migration. These herbivores
Oviposition choice by the Onopordum capitulum weevil Larinus latus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and its effect on the survival of immature stages
TLDR
Overall, survival of eggs laid later in the season into florets was higher, although the adults that emerged were smaller, and competition for resources only appeared to play a role in smaller capitula, and manifested itself in a reduction in the size of emerging adults rather than the death of immatures.
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