Resource dispersion and consumer dominance: scavenging at wolf- and hunter-killed carcasses in Greater Yellowstone, USA

@article{Wilmers2003ResourceDA,
  title={Resource dispersion and consumer dominance: scavenging at wolf- and hunter-killed carcasses in Greater Yellowstone, USA},
  author={Christopher C. Wilmers and Daniel R. Stahler and Robert L. Crabtree and Douglas W. Smith and Wayne M. Getz},
  journal={Ecology Letters},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={996-1003}
}
The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in the northern Rocky Mountains provides the context for a natural experiment to investigate the response of consumers to resources with differing spatial and temporal dispersion regimes. Grey wolves (Canis lupus) and human hunters both provide resource subsidies to scavengers by provisioning them with the remains of their kills. Carrion from hunter kills is highly aggregated in time and space whereas carrion from wolf kills is more dispersed in both time and… 

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