Resolving the relationships of Paleocene placental mammals

@article{Halliday2017ResolvingTR,
  title={Resolving the relationships of Paleocene placental mammals},
  author={Thomas J. D. Halliday and Paul Upchurch and Anjali Goswami},
  journal={Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society},
  year={2017},
  volume={92},
  pages={521 - 550}
}
The ‘Age of Mammals’ began in the Paleocene epoch, the 10 million year interval immediately following the Cretaceous–Palaeogene mass extinction. The apparently rapid shift in mammalian ecomorphs from small, largely insectivorous forms to many small‐to‐large‐bodied, diverse taxa has driven a hypothesis that the end‐Cretaceous heralded an adaptive radiation in placental mammal evolution. However, the affinities of most Paleocene mammals have remained unresolved, despite significant advances in… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is suggested that invasion by new taxa had little impact on Paleocene-Eocene mammal communities because niches were not saturated, consistent with numerous studies of modern communities that record little change in community-scale richness despite turnover in taxonomic composition during invasion.
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