Resilient individuals use positive emotions to bounce back from negative emotional experiences.

@article{Tugade2004ResilientIU,
  title={Resilient individuals use positive emotions to bounce back from negative emotional experiences.},
  author={Michele M. Tugade and Barbara L. Fredrickson},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={86 2},
  pages={
          320-33
        }
}
Theory indicates that resilient individuals "bounce back" from stressful experiences quickly and effectively. Few studies, however, have provided empirical evidence for this theory. The broaden-and-build theory of positive emotions (B. L. Fredrickson, 1998, 2001) is used as a framework for understanding psychological resilience. The authors used a multimethod approach in 3 studies to predict that resilient people use positive emotions to rebound from, and find positive meaning in, stressful… 

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