Residual effects of cannabis use in adolescent and adult brains — A meta-analysis of fMRI studies

@article{BlestHopley2018ResidualEO,
  title={Residual effects of cannabis use in adolescent and adult brains — A meta-analysis of fMRI studies},
  author={Grace Blest-Hopley and Vincent Giampietro and Sagnik Bhattacharyya},
  journal={Neuroscience \& Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year={2018},
  volume={88},
  pages={26-41}
}
HIGHLIGHTSBrain activation alterations associated with cannabis use was examined.Changes in adults and adolescents were examined separately.Studies using fMRI to measure brain activation were combined meta‐analytically.Adult cannabis users had increased activation in frontal and temporal regions.They also had decreased activation in striate area, insula and middle temporal gyrus.Adolescent cannabis users had increased activation in inferior parietal gyrus and putamen. ABSTRACT While numerous… Expand
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