Residential Radon and Risk of Lung Cancer: A Combined Analysis of 7 North American Case-Control Studies

@article{Krewski2005ResidentialRA,
  title={Residential Radon and Risk of Lung Cancer: A Combined Analysis of 7 North American Case-Control Studies},
  author={Daniel Krewski and Jay H. Lubin and Jan M. Zielinski and Michael C. R. Alavanja and Vanessa S. Catalan and Robert W. Field and Judith B. Klotz and Ernest G. Letourneau and Charles F. Lynch and Joseph I Lyon and Dale P. Sandler and Janet B. Schoenberg and Daniel J. Steck and Jan A. J. Stolwijk and Clarice R. Weinberg and Homer B. Wilcox},
  journal={Epidemiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={137-145}
}
Background: Underground miners exposed to high levels of radon have an excess risk of lung cancer. Residential exposure to radon is at much lower levels, and the risk of lung cancer with residential exposure is less clear. We conducted a systematic analysis of pooled data from all North American residential radon studies. Methods: The pooling project included original data from 7 North American case–control studies, all of which used long-term α-track detectors to assess residential radon… Expand
A Combined Analysis of North American Case-Control Studies of Residential Radon and Lung Cancer
TLDR
A systematic analysis of pooled data from all North American residential radon studies was undertaken to provide a more direct characterization of the public health risk posed by prolonged radon exposure, and provides direct evidence of an association between residential Radon and lung cancer risk. Expand
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Residential radon and lung cancer--detailed results of a collaborative analysis of individual data on 7148 persons with lung cancer and 14,208 persons without lung cancer from 13 epidemiologic studies in Europe.
TLDR
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TLDR
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Abstract Pooled analyses of epidemiological case--control studies on lung cancer and residential radon have shown that radon exposure in dwellings increases lung cancer risk, and that the increase isExpand
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is now concluded that radon and its progeny should be treated in the same way as other radionuclides within the ICRP system of protection; that is, doses from rad on and its offspring should be calculated using I CRP biokinetic and dosimetric models. Expand
Residential radon and lung cancer risk: an updated meta- analysis of case-control studies.
TLDR
New evidence is provided supporting the conclusion that residential exposure to radon can significantly increase the risk of lung cancer in a dose-response manner. Expand
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TLDR
The presence of airborne radon even at low concentrations poses a risk of developing lung cancer, with tobacco habit increasing considerably this risk. Expand
Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort.
TLDR
A positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies is found but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant and provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range. Expand
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Estimates of ORs were similar to extrapolations from miner data and consistent with published residential radon studies in North American and Europe, suggesting long‐term radon exposure at concentrations found in many homes increases lung cancer risk. Expand
Radon in homes and risk of lung cancer: collaborative analysis of individual data from 13 European case-control studies.
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Collectively, though not separately, these studies show appreciable hazards from residential radon, particularly for smokers and recent ex-smokers, and indicate that it is responsible for about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe. Expand
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