Residential Mobility and Voter Turnout

@article{Squire1987ResidentialMA,
  title={Residential Mobility and Voter Turnout},
  author={Peverill Squire and Raymond E. Wolfinger and David P Glass},
  journal={American Political Science Review},
  year={1987},
  volume={81},
  pages={45-65}
}
We examine the characteristics of a largely ignored low-turnout group—people who have recently moved. We find that neither demographic nor attitudinal attributes explain their lower turnout. Instead, the requirement that citizens must register anew after each change in residence constitutes the key stumbling block in the trip to the polls. Since nearly one-third of the nation moves every two years, moving has a large impact on national turnout rates. We offer a proposal to reduce the effect of… Expand
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