ResearchGate articles: Age, discipline, audience size, and impact

@article{Thelwall2017ResearchGateAA,
  title={ResearchGate articles: Age, discipline, audience size, and impact},
  author={Mike A Thelwall and Kayvan Kousha},
  journal={Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology},
  year={2017},
  volume={68}
}
  • M. Thelwall, K. Kousha
  • Published 1 February 2017
  • Sociology, Computer Science
  • Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
The large multidisciplinary academic social website ResearchGate aims to help academics to connect with each other and to publicize their work. Despite its popularity, little is known about the age and discipline of the articles uploaded and viewed in the site and whether publication statistics from the site could be useful impact indicators. In response, this article assesses samples of ResearchGate articles uploaded at specific dates, comparing their views in the site to their Mendeley… Expand
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