Research progress of interspecific hybridization in genus Ficus

@article{Jianfeng2019ResearchPO,
  title={Research progress of interspecific hybridization in genus Ficus},
  author={Huang Jianfeng and Xu Rui and Peng Yanqiong},
  journal={Biodiversity Science},
  year={2019}
}
: Hybridization plays a vitally important role in biological evolution and speciation. Although occurring frequently in nature, the prevalence of hybridization events is unevenly distributed across the plants. It is generally considered unlikely for the obligate insect-pollinated plants, due to the much stronger prezygotic barriers which were developed during their long co-evolutionary with the host-specific pollinators, such as the fig–fig-pollinating hybridization process in Ficus because of… 
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More examples of breakdown the 1:1 partner specificity between figs and fig wasps
TLDR
The results suggest that host expansion events where pollinators reproduce in figs other than those of their usual hosts are not uncommon among fig wasps associated with dioecious hosts, and the extent of pollinator-sharing has probably been underestimated.

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