• Corpus ID: 128438913

Research and conservation initiatives for the vulnerable purple-wood wattle: A model for plant species conservation in Australia?

@article{Denham2012ResearchAC,
  title={Research and conservation initiatives for the vulnerable purple-wood wattle: A model for plant species conservation in Australia?},
  author={Andrew J. Denham and Tony D. Auld and David J. Ayre and Cairo N. Forrest and Amy‐Marie Gilpin and Eleanor K. O’Brien and David G. Roberts},
  journal={Australasian plant conservation : journal of the Australian network for plant conservation},
  year={2012},
  volume={21},
  pages={22}
}
  • A. J. Denham, T. Auld, D. Roberts
  • Published 1 December 2012
  • Environmental Science
  • Australasian plant conservation : journal of the Australian network for plant conservation
Research on rare and threatened plants is a major focus of conservation biology. We want to know why species are rare or declining, how best to arrest that decline and what is lost when species become locally extinct. Occasionally, understanding decline is straightforward - e.g. if the species is restricted to fertile soils that are desirable for cultivation. However, managing declining populations is more complex and requires knowledge of genetic diversity and interspecific interactions. 
1 Citations
Isolation and Lack of Potential Mates may Threaten an Endangered Arid-Zone Acacia.
TLDR
It is suggested that, given this species' vast geographic range, a small number of stands with reproductively compatible near neighbors may provide the only sources of novel genotypes.

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